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The Origins of Prescription Opioids

Plants Not Pills

The search for a perfect painkiller is as old as humankind. For thousands of years ancient societies pressed herbs and flowers to try find a cure for chronic pain, but it wasn’t until the 19th century that the discovery of a “miracle drug” changed the course of history like no other drug before.

In the early 1800s, a pharmaceutical assistant named Friedrich Wlhelm Sertürner began experimenting with opium poppies in northern Germany . By then it was well known that the sap from opium poppies could provide effective pain relief. The problem was that not all poppies (or sap for that matter) are created equal. Sometimes the sap wasn’t strong enough. In other cases it was so strong it would prove fatal. What Surtürner discovered was that by isolating a specific alkaloid found in opium, he could administer pain relief in precise doses.

A new drug was born: morphine.

In 1827, the owner of the Engel-Apotheke in Darmstadt, Germany, Emanuel Merck, began to supply morphine on a large scale. The success of his venture led to the foundation of the Merck pharmaceutical company, the first in what would become one of the world’s most powerful industries. Soon afterwards, doctors discovered that injecting the liquid morphine provided quicker and stronger results. The Civil War created an increased demand for the powerful analgesic. From that time on, morphine became a staple on battlefields around the world. Before long it had penetrated the civilian population. Beverages containing morphine were widely sold in US pharmacies. In 1897, a chemist at the Bayer company found and patented another morphine derivative called “Heroin” which was widely used as a cough medicine for children. In addition to opioids, Germany was quickly becoming the world’s largest supplier of cocaine, importing almost all of Peru’s production of the raw stuff for processing and sale.

The reason for Germany as the hub for pharmaceutical production was that it had (and still has) a high concentration of chemists and engineers. Germany also desperately needed to build up a powerful homegrown business that did not rely on foreign imports. Unlike Great Britain, France or Belgium, Germany did not have colonies to rely on for commerce.

World War I would prove another boon for the pharmaceutical industry (war always does), but it had some unexpected after shocks. Addiction to opioids and amphetamines sky rocketed around the world. At the time, pharmaceutical companies were happy to keep up with demand. Not coincidentally, this is the era when we find the first pharmaceutical lobby groups starting to align themselves with politicians, particularly in the US, to ban cannabis, a substance deemed amoral and deadly.

Ironically, long before opioids entered the mainstream market, cannabis in dried and oil form was sold in pharmacies to relieve migraines, indigestion and other common conditions. To give it a more foreign sounding and nefarious connotation, US politicians, with the help of the media, adopted the colloquial name for cannabis used by Mexican immigrant workers: marijuana. Ad campaigns against the substance featured immigrants and minorities, a way of making sure it was associated with race and bred discrimination. In the 1940s, cannabis was federally banned in the US, but opioids in all their ever changing forms have remained legal to this day. The same companies continue to flourish and sell prescription opioids rich in oxycodone. Merck famously supported lobby groups that tried to block legislation limiting the prescription of Oxycontin. 

But Canadians now have an alternative to opioids in the form of medical cannabis. Unlike opioids, which are responsible for thousands of fatal overdoses across Canada each year, there has yet to be a single death recorded as a result of cannabis use. In addition Licensed Producers are far more regulated than pharmaceutical companies and offer safe, effective cannabis in dried, oil and topical forms.

If you or a loved one would like to start accessing safe, effective medical cannabis under Canada’s ACMPR guidelines, then contact Plants Not Pills by clicking here or email info@plantsnotpills.ca

Get Cannabis Covered Under Your Health Benefits

Get Your Cannabis Covered

As many of you have already experienced, we’ve had continued success over the past 12 months in establishing coverage for medical cannabis under major health insurance plans.

We would like to ensure that this service is offered to anyone using cannabis therapy. Please contact us if you have health benefits through your employer, or are covered under a spouse’s plan and wish to have medical marijuana considered for reimbursement as part of your entitlements.

Once successfully approved, your insurance company may cover up to 100% of the cost of dried medical cannabis or cannabis in oil form.

Many patients have reported better outcomes without having the financial stress or burden associated with paying for their medicine.

Feel free to extend this offer to anyone else you know that may be interested.

Highlights

  • NO COST, FEES or COMMITMENTS associated with the process
  • Simple, fast and pleasant. It can take as little as one week to determine coverage
  • You qualify regardless of where and with which Doctor you received your current cannabis authorization
  • If your cannabis prescription is expired it may be renewed as part of the process
  • All your information is kept 100% confidential

                               ___________________________
Please contact us early to begin the process as the clinical staff will work on the order of
requests. Special consideration will be made for patients that have difficulty affording
cannabis therapy. We can be reached by email coverage@plantsnotpills.ca or phone at
1-844-473-6060 or text message 519-317-7701.

Alternately, click here to fill out our coverage registration form and a Plants Not Pills team member will be in touch with you shortly regarding the next steps towards getting your cannabis covered. 

 

Season’s Greetings from Plants Not Pills!

Season's Greetings from Plants Not Pills!

Season’s Greetings from Plants Not Pills!

With the holiday season approaching, Plants Not Pills wants to make sure you are giving yourself the gift of amazing cannabis. This is why we’ve put together a short holiday guide below featuring all the newest, stand out strains that our patients and staff have been raving about.

If you or someone you know is not yet licensed, please note that Plants Not Pills is currently offering a $25 dollar discount on its admin fees. Simply register with the holiday promo code HAPPY16 and we will automatically subtract $25 off any admin fees associated with licensing.

If you feel like trying any of the strains below, please contact patientservices@nlphysicians.com or call 226-456-1497 and we will help you add or switch your Licensed Producer free of charge.

From all of us at Plants Not Pills, we wish you the best of health and a very Happy Holiday Season!

Buddha Haze
(THC: 18%, 0.4%)
CannTrust
$10.50/gram This strong sativa, THC- dominant strain is getting great reviews as a second-to-none sleep aid.
Learn More
 

Platinum Mint Cookies
(THC: 17-20%, CBD: 0.1%)
D.S. & FITZ
$12.00/gram Platinum Mint Cookies is an OG Kush and Durban Poison premium hybrid that takes its users to euphoria’s top floor.
Learn More
Blueberry Kush
(THC: 16%, CBD: 0.4%)
CannTrust
$10.50/gram A potent Indica for those looking for a rich body buzz and serious pain relief. Serious relaxation guaranteed!
Learn More
Great Bear
(THC: 16%, CBD: 0.4%)
Aphria
$5.99/gramCurrently Aphria’s strain of the month, Great Bear is an effective and economical sativa dominant, high THC strain… 
Learn More
Embrace 
(THC: 6.1%, CBD: 9.8%)
D.S. & FITZ
$8.00/gram A Sativa-dominant strain, Embrace is known for its ability to relax without sedation, to relieve without …
Learn More
Wilbur
(THC: 2.5%, CBD: 5.88%)
Aphria
$7.20/gramA vigorous THC/CBD sativa dominant strain that is a perfect pick-me-up for the winter blues and also an effective strain for pain relief…
Learn More

Veterans Group ‘Marijuana for Trauma’ Responds to Cutbacks in the Updated Policy on Medical Marijuana Coverage for Veterans

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TORONTO, ONTARIO–(Marketwired – Nov. 22, 2016) – Canada House Wellness Group Inc. (formerly Abba Medix Group Inc.) (“Canada House“) or the (“Company“) (CSE:CHV)(CSE:CHV.CN)(CNSX:CHV), the parent company of Marijuana for Trauma (“MFT“) is providing this update in response to the Government’s recently announced policy changes regarding medical marijuana coverage for veterans.

In response to Veterans Affairs Canada’s planned cutback of medical marijuana reimbursements to veterans, MFT has pledged to implement clinical programs and processes to help veterans to continue to receive their medically appropriate prescribed amount of medicine.

These changes, which suggest three grams per day to be the maximum reimbursable dose, contradict what thousands of veterans relying on cannabinoid therapy have found to be effective. In our view, appropriately prescribed dosage amounts, based on individual needs, drastically reduces or eliminates their dependence on many other more harmful prescription medications.

The proposed cutback, from ten to three grams daily, is to take effect May 21, 2017 and is “very disheartening to those who have served their country with the Canadian Armed Forces,” says MFT spokesperson and co-founder Mike Southwell, a veteran of 17 years as a military engineer. “A veteran patient consumes an average of six grams of medical marijuana daily and many lives have been restored with this therapy. As an added result, many families are healing and rebuilding their relationships. To compound matters, there is practically no veteran who can afford the gap in coverage that these changes and the associated costs expose them to” said Southwell.

Southwell notes that most veterans have reduced both their dependence on opiate-based medicines and clinical visits to health care professionals for PTSD and pain management, as a direct result of cannabinoid therapy. “This could represent a significant cost savings over prescription medications and with minimal side effects.” adds Southwell. “Veterans have become functioning and productive citizens once again, after being injured in the course of their military service. They are vitally interested in continuing their recovery from trauma. The government must reconsider.”

Without their appropriate allocation of medical marijuana, veterans are at risk of descending back into harmful and abusive forms of self-medication, predicts Andrew Brown, President of MFT Ontario and a 13-year veteran of the Canadian Forces. “Suicides could increase.” he warns. “Veteran Affairs Canada’s arbitrary decision appears to be more of a “knee jerk reaction”, while at the same time, seemingly ignoring data surrounding the decrease in pharmaceutical complications and related medical expenses. We spare no costs whatsoever in rescuing even one soldier from the battlefield when they are missing, wounded or trapped. When we come home injured, after having served our country, does the value of our lives decrease?”

The bedrock of MFT goes back to the founder’s vision of supporting all the needs of veterans in Canada.

MFT hereby commits to all veteran patients that we will do anything in our power to safeguard you from any adverse effect of this decision as we continue our mission to reach every veteran in need of this life-saving medicine.

Canada House Wellness Inc.

Canada House is the parent company of MFT, The Longevity Project Corp., and Abba Medix Corp. The Company’s goal is to become a marketplace leader through strategic partnerships, mergers, and acquisitions to create a fully integrated medical marijuana marketplace. For more information please visit www.abbamedix.com, www.mftgroup.ca and www.plantsnotpills.ca.

Cautionary Statements Regarding Forward-Looking Information

Certain statements within this press release relating to the Company constitute “forward-looking statements”, within the meaning of applicable securities laws, including without limitation, statements regarding future estimates, business plans and/or objectives, sales programs, forecasts and projections, assumptions, expectations, and/or beliefs of future performance, are “forward-looking statements”. Such “forward-looking statements” involve known and unknown risks and uncertainties that could cause actual and future events to differ materially from those anticipated in such statements. Forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, statements with respect to regulatory changes, timeliness of government approvals for the granting of permits and licenses, changes in medical marijuana prices, actual operating performance of facilities, competition and other risks affecting the Company in particular and the medical marijuana industry generally. The Company assumes no responsibility to update or revise forward-looking information to reflect new events or circumstances unless required by law. Neither the CSE nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the CSE) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release.

Clean and Green Medical Marijuana Usage

Go Green

By Kirsten O’Brien

Safe disposal of medical marijuana containers is important as your marijuana is a controlled narcotic. The following are some basic guidelines for how to be clean and green when disposing of your medical marijuana apparatus.

Clean Out Containers
After removing (or ingesting) the marijuana that was in your container, it is important that you turn it upside down and tap it on a hard surface. This is done in order to remove any leftover debris from the buds themselves so that they do not end up spreading to the other garbage. Once you have removed most of the debris from the container, rinse it with warm water. If you are concerned about smell, a quick wash with some dish soap should help to get rid of any sort of smell.

Remove Personal Information
It is important to remove any personal information from the outside of your container. The easiest way to do this is to completely remove all labels from the containers themselves. By soaking your containers for a few minutes in hot water, the labels should be easily removable. If you cannot remove the labels themselves, you can use a permanent black marker to black out any personal information on the labels.

Recycle
Most medical marijuana prescription containers are recyclable, and can be put in with the regular recycling for pick up.

If you have any questions regarding Medical Marijuana cultivation, licensing or use, please don’t hesitate to contact Plants Not Pills at info@plantsnotpills.ca or call 1-844-473-6060